Thanksgiving Deep Fried Turkey Recipe

Thanksgiving Deep Fried Turkey Recipe

5 reviews, 5 star(s). 80% would make again

Ready in 10 hours

The popularity of Cajun Deep Fried Turkey has grown considerably over the last decade. Most people do not realize the terrible mess it makes, and the dangerous consequences that ensue by working in an enclosed space. I know the old pros like to take it outdoors and have a friendly game of horse shoes or washers while enjoying a cold one talking about the football games that are to be played later that day. If you like the taste of a deep fried turkey then it is well worth all of the prep and time it takes to have this on your Holiday menu.

"fantastic recipe. I used the recipe for Thanksgiving. Everyone loved the turkey. I had to use 3 gallons of water so I increase the ingredients accordingly. Fantastic will use again! Thank you"


14 lbs Turkey; completely thawed, (up to 20)
Brine for Turkey
1/2 cup Salt
2 gallons Water
1 bottle Italain Dressing
1/2 cup Creole Seasonings, like Tony Chachere's
1/4 cup Paprika
1 tablespoon Cayenne Pepper
4 cloves fresh Garlic; minced
For the body cavity of the Turkey:
3 sprigs Fresh Thyme; (up to 4)
1 sprigs Sprigs of Fresh Rosemary; (up to 2)
Oil, such as peanut or canola oil; for frying

Original recipe makes 14 Servings



Marinade or Brine your Turkey for at least 8 hours for extra flavor and to make sure it is really moist. You will need a pot big enough to keep in your refrigerator for the 8 hour period to keep your Turkey in. You will mix all ingredients together, and add your Turkey and the marinade to your pot, and cover, and add to the refrigerator overnight. I like to put the fresh herbs directly into the cavity of the bird for a little extra flavor. When you are done marinading you are ready to cook your Turkey.

You will need a completely thawed turkey, a couple gallons of oil, and a very large cooking pot. You can use canola, vegetable oil, but it is better if you use peanut oil. You will also need to truss the turkey, meaning you need to secure the legs, neck flap, wings and tail to the body of the turkey. Make sure that there is not any type of thermometer or device that will pop out on the turkey. It would melt into the oil, not a good thing.

To determine the perfect amount of oil you are going to be using, place the turkey in the pot and add water until the turkey is completely covered plus an inch or two left from the top. If you do not have any room for extra water you will need to get a larger pot. You will then remove the turkey and measure the amount of water left, and this is the amount of oil you will need to fry your turkey.

You will now dry and season your turkey, and make sure that your frying pot is completely dry. You can add any seasonings you like; I prefer to inject my seasonings directly into the bird. You can also add you cooking pot to your stove top and heat to make sure all water is gone before adding to your outdoor fryer heating source. Once completely dry you will add the oil to the pot and bring it to a temperature of about 375 to 400 degrees. Make sure that you are able to get a good read on the temperature. It may fluctuate a few degrees depending on the weather while cooking outside but it should not be that big a deal. You just want to make sure that you are cooking in a covered but ventilated are. If it is raining or snowing it will make your Turkey frying experience for a really bad day.

The turkey needs to be room temperature and dry. Turn off the burner when you put the turkey in. You are going to lower the turkey into the pot of very hot oil 400 degree oil. The oil is going to splatter some and you will need some very good cooking gloves. Just remember to very slowly lower your turkey into the hot oil. A good method here is dunking your turkey, and I do not mean cannon ball either. When you lower your turkey into the hot oil it will boil up. This is why I suggest turning off the burner or heat source when you do it. You may have to do this multiple times and then one time might do the trick. Just make sure that the oil does not overflow the cooking pot.

Once the bird is safely resting in the oil, turn the burner back on to get to a temperature of 350 degrees. Don't wander too far because that turkey will be done soon. A deep fried turkey cooks at a rate of about 3 to 3 1/2 minutes per pound. A ten pound turkey should take 30-35 minutes. If you have a bio thermometer you will need to test the turkey for doneness. The internal temperature needs to read 160-165 degrees. Make sure you are testing between the thigh area, and not hitting a bone to get a correct read.

Remove the turkey from the oil when it's done. Do this slowly and after you have turned off the burner. Let the turkey drain a little bit and you're set to go. Let it rest for about 20 minutes and then carve and enjoy this crisp and delicious bird.

Chef Shelley Pogue, a Cum Laude, Le Cordon Blue graduate and Executive Research and Development Chef, for Vertical Sales and Marketing, San Ramon, CA. Chef Pogue's website is http://www.chefshelleypogue.comArticle Source:

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Calories Per Serving: 411 Get detailed nutrition information, including line-by-line nutrition insights?  Try BigOven Pro for Free for 14 days!

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This recipe was definitely a hit for our Thanksgiving turkey. It was very tasty!! We will be using it again.
amygoostree 2y ago

ayonko 3y ago

Best turkey I have ever made. Everyone loved it and there was none left.
pskelly1 4y ago

fantastic recipe. I used the recipe for Thanksgiving. Everyone loved the turkey. I had to use 3 gallons of water so I increase the ingredients accordingly. Fantastic will use again! Thank you
Bbernero 4y ago

Make sure that after you remove your Turkey from the brine/marinde that you get it completely dry before adding it to you hot oil. [I posted this recipe.]
ChefShelleyPogue 7y ago

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